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May 17, 2019
2:42PM

Brain stimulation may help treat Alzheimer's disease: Study

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A study, published in the journal PLoS One, found that Magnetic stimulation of the brain improves working memory that may lead to a new therapy for individuals living with Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia.


The study found that healthy younger and older adults who received repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) therapy performed better on a memory task than those who received placebo.


Working memory is the process of recalling and then using relevant information while performing a task. It is a key component of day-to-day tasks like driving to a new location, making a recipe, or following instructions.


Lysianne Beynel, a postdoctoral associate at Duke University in the US said the study relies on highly individualised parameters, from the selection of the stimulated target, based on fMRI activation, to the selection of the difficulty, titrated according to subjects' performance.


Functional magnetic resonance imaging or functional MRI (fMRI) measures brain activity by detecting changes associated with blood flow.Beynel said "since these specific parameters can improve performance in healthy subjects, we will be able to extend it to populations with memory deficits."


Researchers said individuals with Alzheimer's disease, which will more than double by 2050, and other forms of dementia, experience progressive loss of working memory and other forms of cognition. This leads to a greater risk of injury or death and reduces their ability to function without home care, they said.


Twenty-nine young adults and 18 older adults completed the study, which involved trying to remember and then reproduce a series of letters in alphabetical order. Participants of all ages who received rTMS performed better than those who received the rTMS-like placebo.




Simon W Davis from Duke University said, "The brain stimulation applied in our study shows that older adults benefited just as much as the young.

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